Should New Jersey's Towns Consolidate? One Organization Says Yes

Advocates for the consolidation of some of New Jersey’s 566 municipalities visited the Berkeley Heights VFW at 15 Locust Avenue on Wednesday to discuss possible methods for townships to merge together and operate under a single governing body.

 

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Non-profit group advocates municipal consolidation

Shared services and municipal consolidation may be hot button issues in New Jersey politics today. But that’s nothing new. As far back as 1895, just when “boroughitis” had struck northern New Jersey and new municipalities were being coined through out the state, an article appeared in “The New York Times” on the topic of consolidating the Oranges.

 

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Merchantville Moves Closer to Consolidation with Cherry Hill

MERCHANTVILLE, NJ – June 14, 2011 – The Merchantville Council last night voted 4-2 to endorse an application by a local grassroots group to form a Municipal Consolidation Study Commission with Cherry Hill. The grassroots group, “Merchantville Connecting for the Future,” will now have the application reviewed by the state Department of Community Affairs. 

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South Bergenite Features Upcoming Courage to Connect NJ Forum

Residents of Rutherford and surrounding communities are invited to an open forum on Wednesday, June 8, at 7 p.m. to discuss how municipal consolidation can provide much needed tax relief. 

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Township Residents Hear Pro-Consolidation Group

WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP — The township came one step closer to consolidating with the Chesters and Mendhams into one 38,000-resident, 100-square-mile town. A dozen Washington Township residents, including Mayor Ken Short, attended a June 1 presentation by Courage to Connect NJ at the public library in Long Valley. 

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Courage to Connect NJ Featured in Long Valley Patch's Week in Review

Courage to Connect NJ, an pro-municipal consolidation group, held a forum at the Washington Township Library on Wednesday and explained the benefits of multiple towns coming together to form one municipality. The 45-minute presentation was followed by a question and answer session with the audience.

Continue reading the full article in the Long Valley Patch.

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Organization Champions Consolidation in Washington Twp.

New Jersey’s government–and economy–won’t be sustainable in 2020, and a change in the state’s municipal structure needs to begin now or bankruptcy is inevitable, according to Courage to Connect NJ, an organization championing municipal consolidation for the purpose of cost-savings.

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State must aid local consolidation studies

This opinion editorial by Courage to Connect NJ Research Director Andrew Bruck originally appeared in the Courier Post. To download a full PDF, click here.

Forty years of school finance litigation — and we still can’t agree what it means to provide a “thorough and efficient” system of public education.

The latest Abbott v. Burke ruling didn’t distinguish between the two parts of New Jersey’s most famous constitutional phrase, but it seems unlikely we’ll ever get to thoroughness without efficiency. In the real world if not in the courts, there’s no separating the two, and it’s time for the Legislature to give both their due.

 

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Courage to Connect NJ featured in The Nonprofit Quarterly

In New Jersey there are 566 towns. California, by comparison, has only 482 municipalities. An organization called Courage to Connect N.J. believes that the situation is unsustainable in light of the growing financial straits of local governments.

 

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Courage to Connect featured on CBS New York

NEW JERSEY (WCBS 880) – A grassroots movement calling for municipal consolidations, is growing in New Jersey.

With a two percent tax cap in place, budgets are tight all across the Garden State. Positions are being cut in schools, police departments and public works.

 

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